Solar panels

Southeast Asia's clean energy transition

This is a new initiative to chronicle the region's clean energy transition, highlighting the opportunities and challenges faced by government, business and society. A series supported by:

Latest stories

In a region where power demand is soaring, microgrids can increase renewable energy adoption and cut reliance on diesel. The most immediate impact, however, could be the ability to hear birdsong again.
If Asia is to rise to the clean energy challenge then sharing energy between countries will be one way to deal with intermittency issues. But political obstacles aside, how will it work?
Harassment, death threats, kidnapping. It's not easy campaigning for renewable energy in Southeast Asia. Eco-Business asked activists in Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam about the challenges they face fighting for a clean energy future.
A Singapore-based renewables startup is on a mission to replace polluting diesel-powered boats with solar-charged electric vessels in Southeast Asia, inspired by a Swedish furniture retailer's disruptive approach to part distribution and assembly.
An ambitious plan is in train to electrify the Philippines' iconic jeepneys to curb pollution. But do Filipino drivers, operators and commuters really want to replace a national cultural symbol with a more modern mode of transport? 

From Around Southeast Asia

If Asia is to rise to the clean energy challenge then sharing energy between countries will be one way to deal with intermittency issues. But political obstacles aside, how will it work?
Asia will drive the growth of the global aviation industry in the next 20 years, expanding the region’s role in ensuring that the industry becomes less taxing on the environment. Here’s a look at what Asia’s airports are doing to prepare for a future of low-carbon aviation.
While China's solar industry expansion has led to a drop in electricity costs from solar power, researchers have also found that it is an 'over investment in redundant construction and overcapacity'.
There is nothing controversial about asking richer countries to cut their emissions and allowing poor countries to burn fossil fuels for their development needs until they reach middle-income status, researchers argue in a new study.
Rotor sails, bubble pumps, battery-powered jets, and next-generation fuel cells. As pressure mounts for the entire transport sector to wean itself off fossil fuels, these technologies are gaining traction.

Further reading

Spotlight on Indonesia

Spotlight on Philippines

Spotlight on Vietnam

The Indonesian government has targeted four cities in Java island to build incineration facilities this year to tackle the country’s plastic waste crisis,...
President Joko Widodo has reportedly said he wants to “start reducing the use of coal", running counter to the administration’s 39 coal-fired plants under...
Southeast Asia is the only region in the world where coal's share of the energy mix is growing. Eco-Business asked David Turk of the International Energy...
Although the climate crisis is slowly gaining media attention, journalists from across Asia still face an uphill task of reporting on the environment. This...
The project has the potential to increase clean energy supply to meet the country's increasing demand while addressing food sustainability issues linked with...
At his fourth State of the Nation address, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte announced policies to advance renewable energy deployment to tap the...
The current move in many countries of South and South East Asia to expand coal-fired power generation will lead to a serious issue of stranded assets.
Southeast Asia is the only region in the world where coal's share of the energy mix is growing. Eco-Business asked David Turk of the International Energy...
Southeast Asia is the only region in the world where coal's share of the energy mix is growing. Eco-Business asked David Turk of the International Energy...
Sand extraction has increased pollution and flooding, lowered groundwater levels, hurt marine life, and exacerbated the occurrence and severity of landslides...
What’s needed for renewables to take off is leadership, vision and a commitment to a better society from the Asean political class, writes Assaad Razzouk.
Known as an environmental pioneer in Vietnam, Khanh Nguy Thi has led her NGO in combating coal use.