Cooking up creative ways to salvage unwanted food

Roughly a third of the world's food gets thrown away each year. That is equivalent to 1.3 billion tonnes, or about 430,000 warships.

From deploying community refrigerators to repurposing unwanted produce, cities across the world are employing inventive strategies to minimise food waste. Alexander Starritt writes for Apolitical that city leaders and entrepreneurs aim to take a bite out of the estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of food tossed away annually. The article is the second in a series of ten to appear on Fast Company.

In Leeds, England, local supermarkets donate enough unsold — but still edible — food daily to provide 600 underprivileged students with free breakfast and lunch, the article says. Galdakao, Spain is one of several cities across Europe with community fridges where leftovers can be given away rather than trashed.

Some municipalities have found new purposes for stale food. In Bordeaux, France, Les Confitures de Dominique turns outdated produce into jam, chutney and soup, Starritt reports. Toast Ale in London collects bread scraps that it uses to brew beer.

As highlighted by Citiscope, the WeFood supermarket in Copenhagen sells expired, damaged and blemished products at steep discounts. Meanwhile, France and Italy have passed laws designed to prevent cities from throwing away expired food.

This story was published with permission from Citiscope, a nonprofit news outlet that covers innovations in cities around the world. More at Citiscope.org

Advertisement
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

Most popular

View all news

Industry Spotlight

View all

Supporting Organisations

ABB
Asia Plantation Capital
Diamond Energy
Basf
City Developments Ltd
DNV-GL
Geocycle
Sindicatum
Olam